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Frequently Asked Questions
For Ancient-Future.Net and ChurchYear.Net

1. Who are You??
2. How Long Have You Been Around?
3. How Can You Be Catholic But Then Include Orthodox Christians?
4. Ok, But What About Protestant Contributors?
5. I Have Issues With, and Objections to, What You Are Doing
6. Can I Ask You A Question?
7. I Wrote You to Correct You, and Did Not Get a Response. Why?
8. Why Did You Change Your Name?
9. Are You Born Again or Evangelical?
10. Why Are There Ads on Your Pages? Isn't That Bad?
11. What if I find an Inappropriate Ad?
12. How Do I Contribute Articles?
13. Is Ancient-Future.Net an Apologetics Site?
14. Are Ancient-Future.Net and ChurchYear.Net Intended for an Academic or Popular Audience?
15. Who or What is "Saint Hilary Communications, LLC?"


1. Who Are You?

We already have a page that explains who we are. It is quite detailed. For those with a short attention span, we are a Catholic website devoted to explaining Catholic Teaching, Practice, and Morality in our current age. We also strongly focus on dialogue and charitable discussion with other Christians, especially Orthodox Christians. As such, we have contributors from other Christian groups.


2. How Long Have You Been Around?

We have been around since March 2003, when our editors set up a geocities page designed to explore postmodern issues from an ancient Christian perspective. Soon, the domain ancient-future.net was set up for this effort. Eventually more contributors joined. When the site was first started, it had an Anglican bent, that is, until the editors became Catholic in 2004. Since then, the site has changed direction, as this letter explains.


3. How Can You Be Catholic But Then Include Orthodox Christians?

We include Orthodox Christians for multiple reasons, but mainly because the Catholic Church calls us to enter into dialogue with other Christians. Recent popes have strongly emphasized dialogue with the Orthodox, because the Catholic Church considers Orthodox sacraments to be valid, and the Orthodox Churches are considered true particular Churches. Only Churches with valid Apostolic Succession can lay claim to this title. In the document Dominus Iesus Pope John Paul II states it thusly:

Therefore, there exists a single Church of Christ, which subsists in the Catholic Church, governed by the Successor of Peter and by the Bishops in communion with him. The Churches which, while not existing in perfect communion with the Catholic Church, remain united to her by means of the closest bonds, that is, by apostolic succession and a valid Eucharist, are true particular Churches. Therefore, the Church of Christ is present and operative also in these Churches, even though they lack full communion with the Catholic Church, since they do not accept the Catholic doctrine of the Primacy, which, according to the will of God, the Bishop of Rome objectively has and exercises over the entire Church (Dominus Iesus, 17).

Thus, even though we lack full communion with Orthodox Christians, what we share in common enables us to have meaningful discussions, and work together to a large degree. Plus, we are working toward ultimate unity, fulfilling the command of our Lord.

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4. Ok, But What About Protestant Contributors?

The Catholic Catechism says:

"...many elements of sanctification and of truth" are found outside the visible confines of the Catholic Church: "the written Word of God; the life of grace; faith, hope, and charity, with the other interior gifts of the Holy Spirit, as well as visible elements." Christ's Spirit uses these Churches and ecclesial communities as means of salvation, whose power derives from the fullness of grace and truth that Christ has entrusted to the Catholic Church. All these blessings come from Christ and lead to him, and are in themselves calls to "Catholic unity" (CCC 819)

While the status of "true particular Church" cannot be bestowed on Protestant churches, this does not mean that we do not have anything in common with Protestants. While our communion with Protestant Christians is more broken than the communion we share with Orthodox Christians, nonetheless we are still called to enter into dialogue with Protestants, and work with them when appropriate. For this reason, and because we pray that we all may be one some day, we include Protestant contributions, insofar as the contributions do not conflict with the Catholic Tradition


5. I Have Issues With, and Objections to, What You Are Doing

Well, out of the millions who surf the web worldwide, we figure some folks are going to have problems with what we say. We respect differences, but if you have a huge problem with us that will be expressed as anger, perhaps surfing somewhere else would be a good idea (we prefer you quietly leaving to getting hate mail). We have a page that deals with objections Here. Having tired of sugar-coated apologetics ourselves, we have tried to provide realistic answers that do not obscure the truth in any way. The editors recognize that it is always helpful to learn the views of others, and to respectfully engage them. However, we do not do email debates, as we do not have the time. There are good chat forums for such debates.


6. Can I Ask You A Question?

Sure you can! Just Contact Us, submit your $5.00 question-processing fee, and ask away. For those joke-challenged, the fee is a joke. Let's not get the Better Business Bureau involved!

Please ask us any questions you may have, whether it is about the Catholic faith, or simply a question about the page. Part of our ministry is to help others understand the Catholic faith, and we do our best to reply to all questions of this nature. If one of us cannot answer your question, we will try to point you to a place that can.


7. I Wrote You to Correct You, and Did Not Get a Response. Why?

Let us say first that we always wish to be corrected about our mistakes with dates, facts, and other items of a more objective nature. We always wish to be corrected if we are teaching contrary to the official teachings of either the Catholic Church or the Orthodox Church. Please contact us to let us know. However, as to "correcting" the Catholic faith, while we certainly value your insights, we cannot respond to every inquiry. First, all of us have day jobs, and we do not have the time to email lengthy personalized defenses of the Catholic faith (although if you post your objection on our forum, you just might get some discussion going). Second, we have been on internet forums and know that debates on religion and Biblical interpretation are often fruitless and can even be hateful. As mentioned above, our policy is that we do not engage in debates over email. We value your insights, and will examine your opinions openly, since exploring alternate viewpoints is how many of us have come to hold our current beliefs. However, on issues of opinion, viewpoint, and biblical/historical interpretation, we just don't have the time to write everybody back, except to perhaps say, "thank you for your perspective and as we are always learning more about the Christian tradition, we will consider your viewpoint."


8. Why Did You Change Your Name?

We used to be "Ancient and Postmodern Catholics." We changed our name to "Ancient and Future Catholics" for multiple reasons. First, our domain is ancient-future.net, and the new name better reflects our domain (thanks to Ken Collins for this pointer). Second, the term "postmodern" is very loaded. Its meaning is so broad, which is the nature of the postmodern era. To some it means, "anything goes," and to others it means the exact opposite, i.e. the recovery of strict moral values discarded during modernism. Postmodernism also describes a kind of politically-correct "hyper-modernism," which promotes theology that is often vague, cloudy, and ambiguous and intelligible only to those thoroughly versed in academic buzz words. Perhaps this is philosophical postmodernism, but it is not our vision of Christian postmodernism. Third, if we are simply ancient and postmodern, we have locked ourselves into an era that itself will pass: "postmodernism." Ancient and Future are far more accurate terms, as we wish to bring the Faith of the Apostles to any and every era, not just the postmodern one.


9. So Are You Born Again or Evangelical?

The Protestant definitions of "born again" and "evangelical" vary, but often refer to American Christians who emphasize having a "personal relationship with Jesus," a phrase not found in the Bible.

In the early Church, being "born again," or as the Greek likely states, "born from above," meant that a person had been baptized, born of water and spirit. In this sense, we, like all Catholics, are "born again." Also, we think of ourselves as evangelical, because, we are Christians who, having been baptized into the ancient, historical and worldwide Church, are personally and collectively transformed by the power of Jesus Christ, and like the Apostles, are ready and willing to share this good news in word and deed. Being Catholic and evangelical is actually not contradictory, seeing how being Catholic, i.e. "according to the whole," means nothing essential to the good news is left out. However, Catholics are not "evangelicals" as modern, Protestant, evangelicals define the term.


10. Why Are There Ads on Your Pages? Isn't That Bad?

We have ads in order to keep our information free and our ministries in operation. We also have the Amazon and Christianbook affiliate programs. Adding all of these together, we are now able to fund our websites and blog (which includes domain fees, monthly web-hosting costs, etc) without using personal money of the editors, as was the case when the site first began. As we move into publishing, we are exploring finding funding that does not rely on Google Ads.

Google quite ingeniously generates ads based on actual page content, meaning that the ads, in theory, should relate to the topic of each page or essay. Nonetheless, on occasion they do not, which is why we regularly patrol our own pages to monitor ads, and immediately remove the ones we deem inappropriate, offensive, heretical, or anti-Catholic. We also block the sites so they won't show up in the future. We have tried to program the ads so as not to be intrusive. Also, we hope that the ads are helpful and point you toward useful businesses, resources, and ideas.


11. What if I find an Inappropriate Ad?

As mentioned above, sometimes google generates offensive or anti-Catholic ads. We regularly patrol our pages for offensive ads, but if you notice an ad that opposes Catholic Teaching or that is inappropriate or offensive, please contact us and include the name of the web address. This way we can block the inappropriate ad. Again, we ask that you please help us by reporting offensive ads, so that we can continue to fund our websites, and provide our readers with helpful ads, rather than unhelpful ones.


12. How Do I Contribute An Article or Other Material?

Unfortunately, we are unable to accept unsolicited articles at this time. This is a logistical and time issue that may be changed in the near future. We still welcome comments and corrections to current articles, or link suggestions. We do, from time-to-time, ask others to write articles, especially those we regularly encounter and get to know from comments at our blog.


13. Is Ancient-Future.Net an Apologetics Site?

Sort of. "Apologetics" is a term often used by Protestants, and some Catholics, and carries baggage with it. In a sense, we consider ourselves an apologetics site, although we prefer to think we are doing what all Catholics are supposed to do. This is to say, we are always trying to better understand our faith, more effectively explain our faith to others, and evangelize others through word and deed. We try to educate individuals of all faiths, including Catholics, about the Catholic Church. We try to dispel myths and explain clearly and fairly what the Catholic Church teaches, and what it does not. Many apologetics websites and books are geared more toward debating, using scriptural and historical proof-texts. We certainly believe it is important to use Scripture and history to explain our beliefs, but we don't necessarily use these tools like other apologetics sites. We believe in effectively explaining and defending the Catholic faith, but also connecting any doctrine or teaching to the Mass, prayer, spirituality, Catholic culture, and moral development. Also, unlike some apologetics sites, which tend to come across as sarcastic and divisive, whatever we write will be done in utmost respect for those with whom we disagree. We also always want to accurately represent those with whom we disagree, avoiding half-truths and stereotypes, common on some anti-Catholic (and sadly, Catholic) apologetic sites. Thus, our apologetics tend to be more holistic and geared toward the postmodern generation.


14. Are Ancient-Future.Net and ChurchYear.Net Intended for an Academic or Popular Audience?

Our materials are mainly written for a popular audience, although we try to employ high standards of accuracy and make sure our material is cited and verified. However, some materials may cover topics of interest primarily to academics, while much of what we write is intended for anyone interested in the topics we cover. Often, our writings are hard to categorize, since almost all of our contributors have an academic background, some in Theology, some in other fields, yet we write so that all (we hope) may understand.


15. Who or What is "Saint Hilary Communications, LLC?"

In order to properly administrate the websites and other informational materials that we operate, Saint Hilary Communications, LLC was formed. Many internet websites operate as Limited Liability Companies, since any website that has ads or affiliate programs (or that sells books and other items, as we hope to) is, in the eyes of the IRS, a business.

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